A Week in Images (Quarantine Learning Report)

As I await my second vaccine, I see a light at the end of the tunnel. I have planned a trip to NYC in May to see my daughter, friends and family. I have a long list of art to see as well. This week, I once again saw so many amazing art related things on line. I’m only sharing some, as it takes a … Continue reading A Week in Images (Quarantine Learning Report)

A Week in Images (Quarantine Learning Report)

I sign up for, and attend, a lot of lectures and classes. Sometimes there will be one I look forward to even more than the rest. The Everson Museum hosted their 11th annual ceramics lecture this past week, and I simply could not wait. Grayson Perry was the featured artist, and while I could not imagine liking Perry more than I already did, his talk … Continue reading A Week in Images (Quarantine Learning Report)

A Week in Images (Quarantine Learning Report)

This week I watched another Norton Lecture, the second of six virtual presentations by Laurie Anderson, recipient of the Charles Eliot Norton Professorship in Poetry at Harvard. I have to admit to having been totally mesmerized by her hour-long presentation. I just kept thinking wow, some people are just so talented and brilliant. Laurie also happens to be a close friend of my dear friend … Continue reading A Week in Images (Quarantine Learning Report)

A Week in Images (Quarantine Learning Report)

Here are a few highlights from my past week of learning and discovery. Last Monday evening I attended a Zoom lecture with Maira Kalman. While I already knew her paintings and illustrations to be charming, it was hearing Kalman talk about her work and life that made me want to be her new best friend. She is sharp, interesting and talented. If you don’t know … Continue reading A Week in Images (Quarantine Learning Report)

More from the Seattle Art Museum in Seattle, WA

I have been carefully and diligently sheltering in place this past year, so going out to a museum Sunday was a big deal for me. The Seattle Art Museum is a mid-sized museum and they have some wonderful pieces in their permanent collection. Seeing most of the work again was like getting back together with long lost friends, and a few new pieces felt like … Continue reading More from the Seattle Art Museum in Seattle, WA

A Week in Images (Quarantine Learning Report)

Since the beginning of quarantine, I have been attending a bunch of terrific online lectures from all across the country. In just the past month or so I’ve had the pleasure of hearing live talks by a list of artists that includes Theaster Gates, Edmund de Waal, Peter Pincus, Syd Carpenter, Ghada Amer, Kathy Butterly, LaToya Ruby Frazier, and Glenn Ligon (with Hilton Als) to name just a few. Continue reading A Week in Images (Quarantine Learning Report)

Thirteen Great Art Books

I absolutely love art books. I buy exhibition catalogs after almost every show I see. They are my souvenirs, and I look at them over and over again. This past year I’ve been trying to keep up with the books for shows that I have missed, or still hope to see. Here are thirteen, some I’ve purchased, some I still want, in no particular order. … Continue reading Thirteen Great Art Books

Rebecca Hutchinson (Quarantine Learning Report)

I spent the weekend taking a participatory Zoom workshop with ceramicist, educator, and installation artist Rebecca Hutchinson. I had not seen Rebecca’s work before, but have been taking lots of classes the past year through the ceramics program at the Office for the Arts at Harvard. If Kathy King, who is the Director of Education of the program and wonderful ceramicist and educator herself, has … Continue reading Rebecca Hutchinson (Quarantine Learning Report)

Ken Price

On his birthday, today I thought a lot about the fabulous Ken Price (February 16, 1935- February 24, 2012). Ken Price was an American artist best known for his small-scale ceramic sculptures which resembled biomorphic blobs, sliced geodes, and surreal teacups. Derived from Mexican-folk pottery, geology, erotic objects, and surf culture, Price’s influences were imaginative and eclectic. “You can see the whole piece and all … Continue reading Ken Price

A glimpse into quarantine life

Today I reached a milestone on my Peloton bike, 300 rides and 80 strength workouts. The bike has been a godsend while sheltering in place. I went through many instructors until I found the one who has gotten me on the bike at minimum five times a week. I’ve been loyal ever since. Cody Rigsby is motivating, hilarious, opinionated and talks so much that the time goes quickly. He has that way that makes you want to make him proud by working hard, even though I don’t know him, and never ride live. Continue reading A glimpse into quarantine life

Wolfgang Laib

I recently visited a sunflower farm, which made me think of the German artist Wolfgang Laib. I loved rewatching this wonderful Art 21 episode on him from 2014. Laib has been collecting pollen of various sorts, such as dandelion and hazelnut, since 1977. In 2013 the Museum of Modern Art held an exhibition of Laib’s work, including the extraordinary “Pollen from Hazelnut.” A room-size installation, … Continue reading Wolfgang Laib

My week that didn’t happen, New York, NY

I was supposed to be in New York City a lot this April, and had a long list of art shows I planned to see on the first trip. Before every visit, I make a list. I organize it by neighborhood, plot out the days so that friends might join me, coordinate evening plans and fit everything in. Then I add on once I’m there. … Continue reading My week that didn’t happen, New York, NY

Royal Ontario Museum (ROM), Harbourfront Centre and the Distillery District, Toronto, Ontario (day three)

My last day in Toronto was a short one as I had a late afternoon flight to catch. I still had places I wanted to see on my list, and unfortunately had to postpone a few artist studio visits until my next trip. The day was grey and blustery, and a snowstorm was expected to hit the city pretty hard. Continue reading Royal Ontario Museum (ROM), Harbourfront Centre and the Distillery District, Toronto, Ontario (day three)

Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO), and a few great neighborhoods, Toronto, Ontario (day two)

I started day two in Toronto by arriving at the Art Gallery of Ontario as soon as it opened. I was excited to see the Diane Arbus show, as I have always loved her photographs, and she was the topic of one of the art history lectures at a Seattle lecture series I’ve been attending this year. I had a renewed interest in her, and her work and even learned that her name is pronounced “Dionne.” I never knew that. Continue reading Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO), and a few great neighborhoods, Toronto, Ontario (day two)

The Gardiner Museum, Bata Shoe Museum and MOCA Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

I got a chance to go to Toronto right before the Coronavirus outbreak, so I now feel especially fortunate to have been able to see so much. I had never been to Toronto before but, having enjoyed everywhere else I’d been to in Canada, I was excited to explore. I got an old fashioned paper map from the hotel and plotted out the two and … Continue reading The Gardiner Museum, Bata Shoe Museum and MOCA Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

Glenstone in Potomac, MD

In 2006 the Glenstone Foundation opened a not-for-profit modern and contemporary art museum in Potomac, Maryland. I spent a recent Sunday afternoon at Glenstone and was delighted that the weather was mild and sunny. The Pavilions, completed in late 2018, added 50,000 square feet for additional exhibition space. The 300 acres it is situated on is comprised of woodland trails to the outdoor sculptures, pavilions … Continue reading Glenstone in Potomac, MD

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, MA and the “Glass Flowers” in Cambridge, MA

My friend Janine is heading to Boston for a quick trip next month and over our favorite cocktails last week she asked me what art she should see when she is there. While Boston is full of good art, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and the Ware Collection of Blaschka Glass Models of Plants (or simply the ‘Glass Flowers’) at the Harvard Museum of Natural … Continue reading Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, MA and the “Glass Flowers” in Cambridge, MA

30 Americans at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, MO and The Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, PA

It’s unusual to get to see the exact same art show in two different cities, only months apart. I first saw “30 Americans” at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, this past summer. Then, right after Art Basel, in December, I went to Philadelphia and saw “30 Americans” again at The Barnes Foundation. It was fun and interesting to see the same work displayed at different venues. The traveling exhibition was conceived of and put on by the Rubell family, The exhibit was first on display at the Rubell Museum in Miami, FL and has been traveling for almost ten years, with only three more locations to go. Continue reading 30 Americans at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, MO and The Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, PA

The SF Museum of Modern Art and SFO Airport in San Francisco, CA

I had not been to the newly expanded San Francisco Museum of Modern Art since it reopened in May of 2016. I was impressed by its beautifully lit gallery spaces, overall size (170,000 square feet of exhibition space) and design. They have over 33,000 works of art in their permanent collection. I was hopeful that they would have one of the two paintings that they own by Bay Area artist Roland Petersen on view, but no such luck. I was enamored nevertheless. Continue reading The SF Museum of Modern Art and SFO Airport in San Francisco, CA

New Art Dealers Alliance (NADA) in Miami, FL

I used to stay at the hotel in Miami Beach in which NADA was held. It was easy to walk through multiple times, but the lighting was bad. NADA has always been a favorite show of mine as the art was cool, but the venue never felt right. That hotel was damaged in a hurricane and remains abandoned, and NADA is now housed at Ice Palace Studios. While a bit harder to get to, the venue is fitting for one of the must-see shows during Art Basel. Last year they had 134 exhibitors and approximately 15,000 visitors. They first launched the fair in 2003. I think this was the best year yet.

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Design Miami in Miami Beach, FL

As the Art Basel fairs have grown, I’ve gotten smarter, and have been staying longer. Even with that, it’s hard to fit everything in. This was my first time attending the Design Miami show, and it was the most beautiful of all of the art fairs. The galleries were obviously carefully selected and the booths were well-curated. Design Miami is not to be missed.

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INK Miami Art Fair in Miami Beach, FL

I’m stepping away from the classic Art Basel fairs, to tie in the INK Miami Art Fair. Like Aqua, INK takes place at a Miami motel. The galleries are on the first floor, and many of the gallery owners stay on the second floor. The show has an open courtyard feel, and after all the years of tagging along with my brother and sister-in-law I’ve come to know the different galleries, owners, staff and the work they showcase. INK, on a whole, couldn’t be more welcoming… Continue reading INK Miami Art Fair in Miami Beach, FL

Meridians at Art Basel in Miami Beach, FL

The Miami Beach Convention Center has been newly renovated, and completed, since last year’s Art Basel. Meridians, curated by Magali Arriola, presented 34 large-scale projects that cannot normally be shown at an art fair. Directly upstairs (via an escalator) from the exhibition hall of Art Basel were large-scale sculptures and paintings, live performances, installations and video projections in about 60,000 square feet of space. Continue reading Meridians at Art Basel in Miami Beach, FL

Art Miami and Context Art Miami in Miami, FL

Art Miami and Context Art Miami are in two adjacent tents located in Miami, FL. They are easy to get to from South Beach, but you have to take into account traffic. It took me an hour to get there, and 12 minutes to get back to my hotel. I went preview night and purposely went to Art Miami first, and to Context with an hour to spare. Art Miami was super… Continue reading Art Miami and Context Art Miami in Miami, FL

Pulse Miami Beach in Miami Beach, FL

Pulse is in a temporary tent, very close to the UNTITLED tent. I got there for the opening VIP brunch, which was actually quite fun. It’s hard to beat the weather in Miami (indoor/outdoor brunch at 11 a.m. in December) and the CBD cocktails and CBD popsicles were quite the hit with the crowd. This is the 15th year for Pulse, with 65 exhibitors. Last year they had 10,000 visitors. Continue reading Pulse Miami Beach in Miami Beach, FL

Scope Miami Beach in Miami Beach, FL

Scope Miami Beach is another fair that makes its home in a tent, right on the beach. Scope has 134 exhibitors, and is in its 19th year. Last year they saw 60,000 visitors. The artwork I was drawn to at Scope happened to all include some sort of cool process or the repurposing of materials. I really enjoyed learning about the artists and their processes, whether from the gallery owners, employees, or the artists themselves. Continue reading Scope Miami Beach in Miami Beach, FL