Walker Street in New York, NY

I am beyond thrilled that galleries are taking over the streets of Tribeca again. I decided to spend some time on Walker Street, just a five minute walk from where I stay when I’m in New York City. Galleries there are a bit more spread out than the Chelsea gallery scene, and I honestly prefer it. I’m reminded of the old Tribeca gallery days, from maybe the late 80’s or 90’s?

First stop: James Cohan Gallery

ALISON ELIZABETH TAYLOR, Meet You There, 2021
Marquetry hybrid
96” x 120 in total (2 panels)
James Cohan
48 Walker

ALISON ELIZABETH TAYLOR, We Don’t Mean You, 2021
Marquetry hybrid
38” x 32 in
James Cohan
48 Walker
Detail
Detail
ALISON ELIZABETH TAYLOR, Midwinter, 2021
Marquetry hybrid
58” x 60 in
James Cohan
48 Walker
Detail

I went for the third time to see Alison Elizabeth Taylor’s show Future Promise at James Cohan. I absolutely adore Taylor’s work, and of all the art I have seen recently, in my dreams I would, if I could, buy a piece by her. Specifically the first image shown above, Meet You There. It is just phenomenal in person.

“Alison Elizabeth Taylor, is an artist known for transforming the historic technique of marquetry or wood inlay into a new form: marquetry hybrid—a novel synthesis of media and process that incorporates inlaid wood, painting, and collaged textures to create a new perspective on painting. Taylor casts a critical and compassionate eye across the breadth of contemporary American experience in works that depict the changing Southwestern landscape and the rural survivalists, hedonists, squatters, and economic misfits of late American capitalism who inhabit it. Taylor pays respect to the innate humanity of her subjects through her choice of this extraordinarily demanding medium. A native Nevadan who grew up through boom and bust cycles in Las Vegas, Taylor derives her tableaux from direct observation. There is a volatile tension between the surface and the subject; as she explains, “The natural beauty inherent in finished wood draws attention to themes more subtle or complex. The splendor of the shellacked wood is an invitation to look at subjects the viewer might otherwise ignore.” (James Cohan)

Next up: Off Paradise

Mitchell Charbonneau, Senseless, 2021
Cast urethane, epoxy, stainless steel, acrylic paint
53” x 25” x 32 in
Off Paradise
120 Walker
Mitchell Charbonneau, Senseless, 2021
Cast urethane, epoxy, fiberglass, stainless steel, acrylic paint
29” x 36” x 24 in
Off Paradise
120 Walker
Mitchell Charbonneau, Senseless, 2021
Cast urethane, epoxy, fiberglass, stainless steel, acrylic paint
30” x 30” x 20 in
Off Paradise
120 Walker
Mitchell Charbonneau, Black Ice, 2021
Painted bronze
7” x 3 in
Edition of 3 + 2 AP
Off Paradise
120 Walker

Off Paradise is a new gallery for me to add to my “will always visit on every trip to New York City” list. The owner, Natacha Polaert, and I spoke for a long time about Charbonneau’s work and process. It is no secret that I adore cast pieces, and this show Senseless was right up my alley. Natacha showed me work from other artists she has shown. She has a great eye. I felt as if I’d made a new friend when I left the gallery. I’m eager to return. This show is up until November 7th.

“Mitchell Charbonneau’s recent cast resin sculptures test the limits of durability in the context of artistic reproduction. The artist places literal and figurative pressure on utilitarian design—those objects made to be collapsible, portable, and transferable—and situates durability as both a material condition as well as a material property, linking the inert world of objects more directly to human intervention. Across a series of cast resin sculptures and installations that replicate everyday utilitarian objects such as folding chairs, shelving units and air fresheners, Charbonneau underscores how production, use, circulation, and disuse determine the accrual and loss of an object’s value and emphasizes the anthropomorphic current that teems below the surfaces of these objects.” (Off Paradise)

On to: The Hole

Monica Kim Garza, Dimsum, 2020-2021
Oil, acrylic, wood and yarn on canvas
58.1” x 80.1 in
The Hole
86 Walker
Monica Kim Garza, Spicy Schzeuan, 2020-2021
Oil, acrylic, yarn glitter on canvas
58.1” x 80.1 in
The Hole
86 Walker
Monica Kim Garza
Left: Corndog, 2021
Oil, acrylic, glitter, embroidery string, felt on canvas
56.1” x 70.1 in

Middle: Let’s Drink Until We Die, 2021
Oil and acrylic on canvas
58.1 “ x 70 in

Right: Mah Gah Ree Tah, 2021
Oil, glitter, acrylic, felt, yarn, collared paper on canvas
56.1” x 64.1 in

The Hole
86 Walker

I had not yet been to The Hole space on Walker, and was excited to check it out. I enjoy going to their space on Bowery (see my blog post from May), as they always have art worth looking at. The glossy, not quite aubergine, floors are wonderful.

Next up: Andrew Kreps Gallery

Ernie Barnes, Blood Conference aka Three Red Lineman, 1966
Acrylic on canvas
47” x 49 in
Andrew Kreps Gallery
55 Walker
Ernie Barnes, From the Pocket, 1992
Acrylic on canvas
48” x 60 in
Andrew Kreps Gallery
55 Walker

“Ernie Barnes was born in 1938 in segregated Durham, North Carolina. Encouraged from a young age by his mother to pursue arts and music, Barnes developed a knowledge of art history through books and catalogues, while he was legally barred from entering the museums that held the paintings he admired. Barnes sought refuge in his sketchbooks before pursuing sports late in high school, which would secure him a full athletic scholarship at North Carolina College at Durham (now North Carolina Central University), where he studied art. Football, and painting remained dual passions for Barnes as he joined the NFL, playing for the San Diego Chargers and Denver Broncos.” (Andrew Kreps Gallery)

And finally: Chapter NY and LUBOV

Jesse Darling, Planes, 2017-21
150 aluminum sheets
Dimensions variable
Chapter NY
60 Walker
Christopher Culver, Fans with Dirty Yellow Sky, 2021
Charcoal and pastel on paper
12” x 9 in
Chapter NY
60 Walker
Shannon Cartier Lucy, Girl at the Loo Table, 2021
Oil on canvas
34” x 48 in
LUBOV
5 E. Broadway #402

While LUBOV is not on Walker Street, I am adding it to this post as it was the grand finale of my Walker Street outing. I went on the recommendation of my new favorite gallery owner Natacha Polaert from Off Paradise. I trusted her opinion, and went on a bit of a wild goose chase trying to find LUBOV, even with the address put into maps on my iPhone. It’s on a weird triangle intersection but I finally found it, and walked up four steep flights of stairs in a very empty feeling building. It was a worthwhile adventure, as the tiny gallery had a beautiful show of paintings by Shannon Cartier Lucy. Her paintings are worth seeing in person.

Behind the canopy is a door, but I never saw a building number
The door does have a nice sign that sayss LUBOV!

The show is open until November 14th. Use my photos above to help you find the gallery!

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